The Varsity Match 2018

WHAT MAKES A GOOD RUGBY PLAYER?

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Varsity.Match
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Rugby is a demanding sport, players are required to sprint, tackle, wrestle and compete for the ball during every play of the game. Technical ability aside, it is the strongest, fastest and most physical teams that dominate the game. Rugby is an 80minute game of two halves, so having a large foundation of aerobic fitness is essential, but this is regularly over emphasized in rugby training. What you have to remember is that during the crucial moments in the game, it is a high intensity display of strength, power or speed that creates or breaks a scoring opportunity followed by periods of aerobic recovery.
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Varsity.Match
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What qualities, skills and capabilities do you believe make a good rugby player?
4 mths
oscar.junior
oscar.junior followed this discussion
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All forwards need good upper body strength. You also need good aerobic fitness levels and good defensive technique. Things like tactical awareness and timing also help, but can only really be learned by experience.
4 mths
Host
Speed and agility are not necessarily skills more an aspect of strength and conditioning. A generic strength and conditioning program from any agility-based sport will help here, but remember there is also larger component of endurance in rugby than a sport like NFL. A good aim would be to match MMA conditioning. To have an idea of ideal weight, most professional players would be in the light-heavyweight class. You should also focus on strengthening the upper body to complement an agile lower body/base and to avoid injury.
4 mths
Host
Speed and agility are not necessarily skills more an aspect of strength and conditioning. A generic strength and conditioning program from any agility-based sport will help here, but remember there is also larger component of endurance in rugby than a sport like NFL. A good aim would be to match MMA conditioning. To have an idea of ideal weight, most professional players would be in the light-heavyweight class. You should also focus on strengthening the upper body to complement an agile lower body/base and to avoid injury.
If we’re talking about speed and agility – we should definitely look to New Zealand’s Conrad Smith. Nicknamed The Snake because of his ability to slither through the smallest of gaps and strike with a sudden burst of speed, he brought fluidity to the All Blacks midfield with his intelligent passing and vision.
Another to call it a day after New Zealand's 2015 Rugby World Cup win at Twickenham and headed to play for Pau, before retiring to join their coaching team.
4 mths
Host
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4 mths
Host
As a collective, FIELD VISION!!! You could have the strongest forwards and the most agile backs and if your scrum-half doesn’t see the field well your team might as well be playing blind. This also applies to each individual player as they carry the ball. Field vision requires split second thinking and analysis of the other team and you own team. It is instinctual to a point so it makes or breaks the team.
4 mths
Host
You should be able to tackle in good form so as not to injure your back, shoulders or risk concussion. This means having a strong core position to stabilise the back, sucking the shoulder into its socket and having the arm in a good position when entering the tackle.
4 mths
Host
You should be able to tackle in good form so as not to injure your back, shoulders or risk concussion. This means having a strong core position to stabilise the back, sucking the shoulder into its socket and having the arm in a good position when entering the tackle.
Just to add to that as well, the head should be ideally placed behind the ball carrier so as to not risk an impact that could lead to concussion.
4 mths
Host
You should be able to know how high to tackle and how to minimise the chances of a tackle break!!!
4 mths
Host
You should be able to know how high to tackle and how to minimise the chances of a tackle break!!!
To minimise a tackle break a player must be aware of the ball carrier's space and that of the other players and the field. A tackler should choose an appropriate side based on the objective at hand. If for example the touch line is nearby and to the right, a tackler should position themselves to the left of the ball carrier so as to minimise the chances of being stepped back inside.
A good rule of thumb is lining your outside foot with their inside foot. If the ball carrier adjusts to either side the tackler should also mirror this movement. By closing the gap and maintaining this lateral distance the tackler can force the ball carrier to the touchline or into a supporting tackler.
4 mths
Host
All players should be able to pass long and short distances as well as quickly and accurately to both sides.
4 mths
Host
A good player should know their ability to change lateral direction and work to be competent at stepping off both legs. Knowing their capabilities will enable an attacker to time a step correctly and place a tackler out of position, making or facilitating a line-break.
4 mths
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