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Shocking Death Of Ms Dhu

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Senior Constable Burgess testified that Sergeant Rick Bond - who has since quit the force - told her Ms Dhu was a junkie who was faking illness.

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Senior Constable Burgess testified that Sergeant Rick Bond - who has since quit the force - told her Ms Dhu was a junkie who was faking illness.

How shocking is this story.
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We are all diminished by these continual injustices
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The death of Ms Dhu is a national disgrace. She was an indigenous woman and a domestic violence survivor who desperately needed help - but when she cried out in pain no help came. We can't help but wonder if she were white, would she still be alive?
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A death sentence for unpaid fines ! I have fines ,no one comes to drag me off to prison for not paying them .I get offered a payment plan .
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Trivia: No Australian police officer has ever been convicted of an Aboriginal death in custody.
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Just goes to show the left over oppression from colonial Australia.
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As a teenager, Ms Dhu should have been cautioned and diverted for her low-level offending, rather than arrested by police and fined by a magistrate. As a young adult – poor and in a domestic violence situation – she should have never been taken into police custody and locked up for being unable to pay her fines. And in custody, she should have never been treated inhumanely and with such contempt for her wellbeing. Ms Dhu should never have died in custody.

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I sat with Ms Dhu's family when the footage of her death was played in the Coroner's Court. They held their breath, watching their beloved daughter, sister, cousin and granddaughter crying out in pain, being dismissed and ignored by those who owed her a duty of care
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Ms Dhu, whose first name is not used for cultural reasons, died slowly and alone on the concrete floor of a regional police cell at South Hedland police station in August 2014. She was 22 years old, had never been in custody before and was locked up for three days because she couldn't pay her fines.
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From day one of the first inquest back in November, from the first seconds of that footage, you could see her limping and you could hear her moaning in pain.
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From day one of the first inquest back in November, from the first seconds of that footage, you could see her limping and you could hear her moaning in pain.
There was definitely something wrong going on in that prison. I hope they fry the people who did this to her. No excuse.
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So in truth, we should not be shocked by the brutality of Ms Dhu's death when for so long we, and our elected representatives, have ignored the evidence.
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However, Ms Dhu's father does not want the last portion of it made public because"she had either passed away … or was moments away from dying".

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We are in the days were the value of another life seems to be at an all time low. We all must love each and no matter what never take a life unless you absolutely must.
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The Western Australian Coroner presiding over the inquest into Ms Dhu's death in police custody will decide whether to publicly release harrowing footage of Ms Dhu, a young Yamatji woman, dying a cruel, unnecessary death.
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Western Australia has the highest Aboriginal imprisonment rates in Australia; and Aboriginal women are the fastest-growing prisoner demographic in the country.
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