Politics, news & academia

Political Correctness and censorship

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rohan-chaney
rohan-chaneyHost

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Any debate with Donald Trump in it will not be stifled by political correctness. Luckily right now I do not think the knows what that is and I hope he never learns. Let is fly Donald!!!
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Last year a British freedom of speech society that I chaired (then called the ‘Birkenhead Society’; now called ‘Discourse UK’) overturned the Labour Home Secretary Jacqui’ Smith’s Ban on the Dutch MP Geert Wilders speaking in Parliament on the subject of multiculturalism and Islam.
I was shocked that the Labour Government was willing to ban speech in Parliament (reasoned debate being a clear expression, and an embodiment, of the best of British culture) in order to preserve multiculturalism and alien cultures through political correctness.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2044748/Political-correctness-continues-stifle-debate-regarding-impact-multiculturalism.html#ixzz4FymfJJoH
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Back in the ‘90s, the conversation around political correctness was largely driven by anecdote that could easily be distorted to support a particular point of view. Last year, the same magazine that published Taylor’s 1991 story returned to the topic, this time publishing a treatise on political correctness by Jonathan Chait.
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Censorship forbids certain things. However, at least here in America, we have quite a lot of freedom to express ourselves. People are allowed to be jerks all they want. Many hateful organizations still exist, people still have the right to use whatever vulgar language they want to use, they are allowed to protest either for good or bad. Political Correctness just reminds some people that because you can do it, it doesn't mean you should do it.
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We are Americans and we should be able to say whatever we want whenever we want. We have seen what censoring has done to other countries and we do not want any of that here.
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We need to get back to freedom of speech without fear of being labeled racist, bigoted. We are slowly loosing our liberties through the failed ideology of multiculturalism and laws being imposed upon us by burocrats.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2044748/Political-correctness-continues-stifle-debate-regarding-impact-multiculturalism.html#ixzz4GEPSwoTL
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
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We need to get back to freedom of speech without fear of being labeled racist, bigoted. We are slowly loosing our liberties through the failed ideology of multiculturalism and laws being imposed upon us by burocrats.
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Somewhere along the line, the idea of being “politically correct” itself started to be used as a disparaging term. Originally used to remind people to be respectful, political correctness became a term of disrespect used against those simply trying not to offend. Sometimes things went too far, as in a recent incident at UNH. When I first read their new list of appropriate terms, I thought it had to be a joke. Fortunately many other people thought so too and that list is gone, as well it should be.
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I refused to be censored even a little. My father and grandfather are red blooded American to the bone and I was raised to speak my peace.
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Since when is being polite considered censorship? I've been taught all my life to respect people and to speak and act politely toward them. Many people were not taught that lesson or, for their own reason, have chosen to ignore it. Political Correctness is just society's way of saying"Hey, don't be a jerk! Act like a human!" Which is kinda pathetic that we have to have this thing called Politically Correct in order for people to behave properly. It's not the same as censorship though.
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American society has always been deeply ambivalent about these questions. On the one hand, our history is filled with examples of overt government censorship, from the 1873 Comstock Law to the 1996 Communications Decency Act. On the other hand, the commitment to freedom of imagination and expression is deeply embedded in our national psyche, buttressed by the First Amendment, and supported by a long line of Supreme Court decisions.
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I think people especially politicians have become very good at getting their point across and staying with the lines of political correctness. I think it does for the average American cause some problems but they are not in front of a camera usually so they are free to say what they want.
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Being politically correct isn’t about censorship, but it is about treating others with respect and becoming a better person. It is about taking responsibility for our words and the repercussions that come from them.
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Being politically correct isn’t about censorship, but it is about treating others with respect and becoming a better person. It is about taking responsibility for our words and the repercussions that come from them.
I think most people think that freedom of speech does not come with repercussions but that is totally wrong. We must always be prepared for the backlash of saying whatever you want. There should bot be criminal backlashes but you will have problems if you offend the wrong person with your speech.
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Consider, if you will, the air. Here it is, all around us, plentiful, freely available, and broadly breathable. And yes, I know, it’s not perfectly clean or perfectly pure, but here it nevertheless is, plenty of it, enough for all of us and lots to spare. When breathable air is available so freely and in such quantity, it would be redundant to demand that breathable air be freely provided to all, in sufficient quantity for the needs of all. What you have, you can easily take for granted, and ignore. There’s just no need to make a fuss about it. You breathe the freely available, broadly breathable air, and you get on with your day. The air is not a subject. It is not something that most of us want to discuss.
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