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Native Americans Still Fighting For Their Land

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gary-williams
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The Dakota Access Pipeline would span more than 1,100 miles from North Dakota to Illinois, dipping under the Missouri River. The tribe says it would threaten nearby burial sites and the Sioux water supply if there were a spill. Outrage over the pipeline has galvanized Native American tribes across the U.S. in a way not seen in decades.
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They are also still be disrespecting and mistreated. I saw videos of dogs being used against them and also pepper spray on their own land. That would really make me angry.
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Sioux protestors, along with environmentalists, celebrities and members of other Native American tribes, have strongly opposed the pipeline, which would run near their reservation in North Dakota. They say it would disturb sacred land, including burial sites, and affect the tribe’s drinking water.
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The American nation began to expand west during the middle eighteen hundreds. People settled in the great open areas of the Dakotas, Utah, Wyoming, and California. The movement forced the nation to deal with great tribes of native American Indians. The Indians had lived in the western territories for hundreds of years.
3 y
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The American nation began to expand west during the middle eighteen hundreds. People settled in the great open areas of the Dakotas, Utah, Wyoming, and California. The movement forced the nation to deal with great tribes of native American Indians. The Indians had lived in the western territories for hundreds of years.
They should be allowed to stay there and I am sure they can find a different way to build a pipeline. These people have been through enough and every few years it seems the government tries something new to take away more land from them.
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