Community, charity & causes

Cecil the Lion - one year later

31
kristi-hansen
kristi-hansenHost

Expired
Host
In the last fifty years alone, approximately 50 percent of Africa’s lions have disappeared. What has happened to them all? In South Africa, many have fallen victim to poachers. Recently, lions have also faced the threat of canned hunting — hunts in which animals are confined in an area from which they cannot escape — to increasingly detrimental effect.
3 y
Host
Some hunters and wildlife conservation advocates argue that canned hunting can help conserve threatened species. That for every captive lion killed, a wild lion is saved. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute suggests that, “establishing captive populations for saving species from extinction is an important contribution… to conservation.
3 y
Host
The African lion is one of the world’s most beloved species – as the celebration of World Lion Day today attests. Unfortunately, ensuring that healthy, wild lion populations continue to roam Africa’s savannas has become increasingly challenging.
3 y
Host
Such killings are especially attractive to customers looking to bag one of the Africa Big Five, which are lions, leopards, rhinos, elephants and cape buffalo. There are about 200 ranches across South Africa where a customer can pay anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000 to shoot one of the country's 6,000 captive lions.
3 y
Host
Lion numbers are in steep decline across Africa, but trophy hunting is only partly responsible for the long-term losses, say conservationists.
3 y
Host
I don't agree with factory farming either. Doesn't make canned lion hunting any more acceptable. In fact canned lion hunting is worse as it's effectively factory hunting.
3 y
Host
The researchers also disregard that many of these animals live in social structures and killing some disrupts this structure, which–in addition to being unnecessary and cruel–often with unintended consequences. Just remember that nobody knew whether Cecil’s offspring would be killed by other male lions.
3 y
Host
Cecil the lion – the most famous creature in one of Zimbabwe's national parks – was killed by an American hunter who has boasted about shooting a menagerie of animals with his bow and arrow, The Telegraph can reveal.
3 y
Host
The death of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe has drawn international attention to the species’ plight. But while poaching, illegal and poorly managed hunting are a concern, the most common causes of wild lion mortality – conflicts with local communities and habitat loss – are vitally important to address.
3 y
Host
The practice of so-called canned hunts, where hunters pay upwards of $20,000 to target African lions in huge, fenced-in areas, could be doomed thanks to the U.S. government’s move in December to protect the animals under the Endangered Species Act
3 y