Health, wellness & sport

Body Dismorphia and Body Acceptance.

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ophelia.winterson
ophelia.wintersonHost

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People who have body dysmorphic disorder think about their real or perceived flaws for hours each day. They can't control their negative thoughts and don't believe people who tell them that they look fine. Their thoughts may cause severe emotional distress and interfere with their daily functioning. They may miss work or school, avoid social situations and isolate themselves, even from family and friends, because they fear others will notice their flaws. They may even undergo unnecessary plastic surgeries to correct perceived imperfections, never finding satisfaction with the results.
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No one is perfect. Even those who are blessed with beautiful faces and bodies have flaws.
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People with BDD can dislike any part of their body, although they often find fault with their hair, skin, nose, chest, or stomach. In reality, a perceived defect may be only a slight imperfection or nonexistent. But for someone with BDD, the flaw is significant and prominent, often causing severe emotional distress and difficulties in daily functioning.
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Loving yourself may be hard because seeing celebrities so gorgeous make you feel insecure. People want to look like them. Let's be realistic, we can't be them. We're unique in our own way.
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Love what you have. Appreciate what God has given you. No need for plastic surgeries or whatsoever.
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A large portion of us have something we don't care for about our appearance a screwy nose, an uneven grin, or eyes that are too expansive or too little. Also, however we may worry about our blemishes, they don't meddle with our day by day lives.
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I am bothered with simple skin discoloration. lol. But not to the extreme of applying a lot of almost anything there is in the market. :-D
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I am not overly conscious about my face or body. I take care of myself but I do not over do anything.
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I love myself and so I love my body though there are flaws. :-D
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I know my body isn't perfect but I love myself. I don't care what society says. I don't need to fit that mold. I am my own unique self and it'll stay that way. I don't need surgeries to improve myself.
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I've always known I'm not Brad Pitt and I accept that. I'm just happy I'm not disfigured. I try to be positive so I don't compare myself to them.
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Body dysmorphia has sometimes been called imagined ugliness. Body dysmorphic disorder is also occasionally referred to as dysmorphophobia, or the fear of having a deformity.
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People are so conscious of themselves because we see beautiful people everywhere. It's hard because people feel ugly compared to celebrities. Some people even get surgery to feel good about themselves.
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I used to hate my body because I'm curvy and tall. I accepted that I'm never gonna be like those petite girls because I'm a glamazon. I learned to like my curves and my height. I see it as an advantage over the other women.
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Everyone has physical imperfections. We need to accept that and not follow what society dictates. We will never be satisfied if we give in to society.
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Everyone has physical imperfections. We need to accept that and not follow what society dictates. We will never be satisfied if we give in to society.
True. Society presents an impossible image of what's beautiful. I don't plastic surgery would help because you'll always find something wrong about yourself.
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We need to learn to accept we are all unique. Being content with ourselves, even our flaws would help us love ourselves more. We need to acknowledge we are not perfect.
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We can only be happy if we learn to accept and love ourselves for who and what we are. There is nothing wrong in improving your looks and everything, just don't over do it.
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I have some body parts that I don't like but I can live with them. I do not need to do anything.
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Distorted body image (also called negative body image) refers to an unrealistic view of how someone sees their body. You begin forming your perceptions of your body’s attractiveness, health, acceptability and functionality in early childhood. This body image continues to form as you age and receive feedback from peers, family member, coaches, etc. Personality traits such as perfectionism and self criticism can also influence the development of a negative internalized image of your body.
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