Mental Health

A New Look at Grief

327
GuillermoJuarez
GuillermoJuarezHost

Ends in 1 d, 10 h
By host - GuillermoJuarez
Edie Weinstein, a bereavement counselor, recognized that there are far more than five stages of grief that companion Elisabeth Kubler-Ross’s theory. From her experience as a counselor and having had close friends who have died, she has discovered that grief is not cookie cutter and is as diverse in expression as those experiencing it.
This discussion is set to be extendable. After it expires, the content will remain, but all guests will be removed. After that if any guests decide to join it, more days will be added to the discussion
GuillermoJuarez
GuillermoJuarez followed this discussion
Host
Here are the stages according to Edie:
1. Euphoria
2. Surrealism - Someone is missing, but we can’t quite wrap our minds around their absence.
3. God-wrestling
4. Reconciliation
5. Gratitude - Appreciating the connection with loved ones, regardless of the duration.
6. Peace - When I can allow myself to feel it all; the pain and pleasure of having known this person,
2 mths
Host
Have you experienced the loss of a loved one? How was your experience compared to Edie's?
2 mths
liliana-malachi followed this discussion
Host
Surrealism. Yes. I don’t think I was even in denial w my mother, who died suddenly of ovarian cancer just this past Christmas morning. We found out Christmas Eve she had cancer and was gone less than 24 hrs later. I’m not in denial, but it’s all so surreal. Like I’m in some alternate universe where everything in my life is suddenly different and I just can’t process all the sudden changes. Then anger and sadden engulf me, but my baseline is just surreal.
2 mths
10 more people followed this discussion
Host
There are so many stages on grieving processes , I also even don't know how to deal with it , I might keep I am fine in front of people , but feel sorrowful in private time .just like this morning when I woke up ....not so easy to handle it as well .
2 mths
mstf-mstf-1, alex.benau, muhammad .numan and 7 other people started following this discussion
Host
When you lose someone you love, a part of you sits down and the rest of you moves on because you know you have to.
2 mths
Host
t sucks. But it happens. And it happens to those you love.
2 mths
10 more people followed this discussion
Host
There’s nothing you can do to take the pain away. You can try to numb, medicate or desensitize it, but underneath it all, it still hurts.
2 mths
Host
Sit with your pain and allow it to flow in whatever way it needs to flow. Sometimes that means lashing out in anger and beating up your pillow.
2 mths
Host
When we allow the pain, we take a powerful step toward healing.
2 mths
More than 50 people have joined this discussion.
Host
Don’t let others tell you when you should move on or that you should’ve gotten over it by now. We all heal at a different pace and pain affects each of us in varying degrees. Allow yourself the time YOU need to move through it.
2 mths
Host
Journaling may sound like a weird tip for managing grief and concentration, but sometimes the problem is that you have so many thoughts swimming in your head. You just can’t possibly keep them all in there and hope to focus. Getting some of those thoughts out in a journal can (at least temporarily) clear some space to let you focus for a while.
2 mths